Over the course of July and early August 2010, Pakistan experienced the worst monsoon‐related floods in living memory. Heavy rainfall, flash floods and riverine floods have devastated large parts of Pakistan since the arrival of seasonal monsoon rains on 22 July. Assessments of losses and damages are ongoing, but estimates place the number of affected people at more than 14 million. Over 1,200 people have died, and at least 288,000 homes have been damaged or destroyed.

In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) Province, intense rains during the last week of July and in early August were compounded by the swelling of major rivers due to rainwater surging down from the highland areas. The Pakistan Meteorological Department reports that within one week in late July, KPK received 9,000 millimetres of rainfall ‐ ten times as much as the province normally receives in the course of an entire year. Baluchistan, Pakistan‐Administered Kashmir and Gilgit Baltistan, also experienced extreme weather, resulting in widespread losses and damages.

 
         
  Downlaod Appeal for responding to Pakistan Flood
Download Pattan situation-need assessment reports
Download Thatta Flood Update by PDI August, 28 - 2010
Download NWHO Flood Update
     
     
 
   
Reducing Disaster Risk is a job for all” Ban Ki Moon, UN Secretary General addresses the first ever UN General Assembly Informal Thematic Debate on Disaster Risk Reduction, 9th February, 2011.Know More
Building Livelihood Resilience in Changing Climate” held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 3 -5  March 2011 organized by Wetlands International & Cordaid.Know More
         
 
 
Pakistan's worst floods in 80 year

Pakistan's worst floods in 80 years have killed more than 1,600 people and affected up to 20 million - more than a tenth of the population. The United Nations estimates at least 8 million people need urgent assistance.
A rich insight on humanitarian aid, risk reduction and development issues in the Asian region through stories, research papers, books, photo essays and videos.
In the morning of the rain, I was stranded in a tiny building along Commonwealth Avenue.I was there with my sister for a seminar that, like many other engagements that Saturday, would never materialize. I left the house early, thinking it was just one of those rainy mornings where some flooding might delay engagements, but otherwise nothing out of the ordinary
   
 
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